04 February 2008


What a deep trough of funk it all is: the bald, first-hand experience of a shoddy economy, constructed as it is on a foundation of fiction and bad intentions, doing the oft-predicted and inevitable dead-weight fall straight to the bottom of the proverbial crapper. Take it from me --going through the motions of the jobless routine, under current circumstances, is bad enough, but absent-mindedly switching on the electric tee-vee yesterday morning and getting an accidental eye-full of the horrible twaddle being broadcast by the local Fox affiliate is ... another matter entirely.

Luckily the sound was muted on my completely antiquated, rabbit-ear-equipped tee-vee machine, thereby partially deflecting the debilitating consequences of whatever "point" the dirtbags at Fox were trying to make in this particular instance. Frantic, rapid-fire, zero-attention-span image flashes of some of the "officially" sanctioned presidential candidates, interspersed with numerous examples of American football iconography and pictures of an empty stadium in Arizona; a short parade of severely coifed blowholes, the typically interchangeable animatronic wind machines for which Fox is so justly infamous, appeared to help tie these apparent incongruities together, in the usual big-media way of conflating and co-mingling and utterly confusing the deadly serious with the obnoxiously inane. That, of course, is Fox's primary function. In fact, they and all their corporate media cohorts have been so successful in befuddling the leaking brain-bags of the distracted masses, most people can't tell which of these bloated spectacles -- presidential politics and professional sports -- could legitimately be characterized as "deadly serious" and which is merely "obnoxiously inane." Even I can't figure it out sometimes.

One thing of which I'm reasonably sure, pretty much beyond doubt, is that I've come to despise both of these hollow circuses equally. "Super Tuesday" becomes an extension of "Super Sunday"; the systems and methodology by which democratic "self-government" perpetuates itself is debased, corrupted, and completely eviscerated, bashed and battered and shoehorned into the desperately empty straightjacket of commerce and "entertainment." Indeed, the electoral process is relegated to a position somewhere below the empty-calorie excitement of artificial extravaganzas such as the "Super Bowl," if the volume and tenor of attention paid to these things is any indication.


So, here in the trough of Miserable Monday, where the hollow hangover of yesterday's over-excited waste of time still lingers, and which leads directly into tomorrow's made-for-TV "Super Tuesday" diversion, I order another beer and try to think about these comprehensive frauds as little as humanly possible. What else is there to do? I know that my vote tomorrow in the Green primary -- and yes, there is such a thing, regardless of what the corporate flying monkeys would have everyone believe -- for Cynthia McKinney (Ralph Nader is on the ballot as well) doesn't have a prayer of changing the course of this stupid country, or having an affect on anything in particular. But, so the hell what? It's no more of a "wasted" vote than one cast for Obama or Clinton, or anyone else you can think of. I defy anyone to prove me wrong.


Where's my bartender ...?

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